Company News


  • Symantec Puts $1B Web Certificate Business Up For Sale; CEO Jeremy Samide Comments

    Jeremy Samide about the Fidelis

    Stealthcare will Continue to Take Symantec’s New Technologies to the Market, says Samide

    CEO Jeremy Samide says Symantec selling its certificate business is a “smart move” and that Stealthcare “continues to sell Symantec’s endpoint, cloud, email, enterprise, and DLP products." He continued, "The certificate business has become commoditized, and we are excited to see Symantec focus their R&D on their endpoint products, the cloud, and other enterprise products."

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  • CEO Jeremy Samide Sees "Steadily Growing" Business with Fidelis

    Jeremy Samide about the Fidelis

    Fidelis Cybersecurity has landed a former Forcepoint CEO as new top executive.

    Jeremy Samide, CEO of Stealthcare, an Ohio-based Fidelis partner, said he is excited about the appointment, saying McCormack "certainly has the pedigree in leadership, technology, product development and the cybersecurity landscape" for the role.

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  • Jeremy Samide Sees Growth as Intel Security Re-Emerges As McAfee

    Jeremy Samide

    Intel Security Re-Emerges As McAfee, A $2 Billion Security Company

    McAfee is officially back. Intel Security has officially reassumed its heritage brand, with the announcement Tuesday that it has split from parent company Intel and is now a standalone security vendor.

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  • CEO Jeremy Samide Interviewed on How to Protect Your Data

    Jeremy Samide

    Jeremy Samide in conversation with CFRA's John Budden, on how to prevent theft of, or irreparable damage to, one's data and private information that can result from an internet invasion.

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  • Leading Cyber Security Expert Jeremy Samide to Help Establish Ethics Code of Conduct for Cyber Peace and Security

    Jeremy Samide

    "I am honored to be a part of the Boston Global Forum's Young Leaders Network for Peace and Security," states Jeremy Samide. "This is an illustrious organization comprised of a diverse group of distinguished professionals dedicated to protecting the global community at large".

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  • Super Bowl Cyberattacks May Blitz Companies, Sponsors

    Hackers see the Super Bowl “as a treasure trove of information” and may take advantage of the increased exposure and influx of data warns CEO Jeremy Samide.

    The NFL’s Super Bowl attracts millions of fans but also is an inviting cybersecurity target against corporate sponsors and the participating teams, cybersecurity professionals told Bloomberg BNA.

    Companies looking to benefit from Super Bowl exposure need to be aware of the risks that go along with the heightened visibility, Jeremy Samide, chief executive officer of Ohio-based cybersecurity company Stealthcare LLC, told Bloomberg BNA Feb. 2. Hackers see the Super Bowl “as a treasure trove of information” and may take advantage of the increased exposure and influx of data, he said.

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  • What are the Risks of Blockchain Technology?

    CEO Jeremy Samide evaluates the pros and cons of using blockchain technology.

    Cybersecurity has been a big concern over the last several years. This year alone we have seen rising trends in the deployment of sophisticated ransomware, banking Trojans, distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, cybertheft, and even cyberattacks on politicians. So, what can be done to enhance security for all things cyber? There is no panacea as far as cybersecurity goes. There are too many parts and pieces for one thing to fix it all. However, there is a certain technology called blockchain that could in theory be used to secure many aspects of cyber.

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  • Trump’s Unpredictability May Create Cybersecurity Quagmire

    Dec. 6 — The unpredictability and assertive tone of the incoming Trump administration may motivate nation-state and black hat hackers to more aggressively attack the U.S., cybersecurity analysts told Bloomberg BNA.

    For cybersecurity, instead of draining the swamp President-elect Donald Trump may be creating a cyberattack risk quagmire.

    U.S. companies may also be worried by more motivated nation-states, such as Russia, China and North Korea, that may leverage against them any information stolen from the transition team and incoming government.

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  • CEO Jeremy Samide Warns of Limits to Cloud Security

    Jeremy Samide warns that "moving data to the cloud doesn't make it safer".

    The current cybersecurity hype is starting to sink in for many companies and consumers who are desperate for real solutions to protect their data. The economics suggest that more organizations are looking at the cloud, but is that a more secure solution, as many currently believe? Says Jeremy: "Cloud companies are providing more economical solutions to the enterprise, however, I think the cloud presents a tremendous amount of risk to any organization that migrates to it."

    As legacy cyber security companies continue to wither on the vine, cloud companies will most likely continue to rise, however, this only presents a new focus for hackers, says Jeremy: "We have already seen giant cloud providers get knocked off line from cyber attacks rendering their services to their clients unresponsive. Also, just because a client or customer moves their data to the cloud doesn’t necessarily make it safer. This just creates a new lightning rod or ultimate honeypot for the hackers to include in state sponsored attacks. "

    The bottom line, he says is that organizations and how they conduct their business will continue to be the weak link. Staying on the cutting edge of cyber technology is a must, along with a layered approach. Cloud security should not be seen as a cure-all.

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  • Why Banks Need to Rethink Their Cybersecurity Strategy

    CEO Jeremy Samide warns that banks need to focus on cutting edge technologies to survive the cyberwar.

    Banks are lending more than money these days. As banks and financial institutions all over the world continue to expand their digital footprint by aggressively marketing for new customers, keeping pace with regulatory compliance and implementing new technology services to better serve is current customer base, they are lending more risk to their customers than ever before.

    With over 70% of cyber attacks today categorized as financially motivated, hackers have their sites fixed on a relatively easy bank heist worthy of John Dilinger’s approval. With financial institutions trying to compete for business, they are rapidly deploying more cloud-based solutions, mobile banking options and global online services susceptible to cyber attacks. Banks are making some progress but still lack a formidable strategy to combat the evolution of cyber threats.

    Boards and the C-suite need a new approach and more "out of the box" thinking in order to stay afloat if financial institutions intend to turn the tide in their fight. Everyone is a target, big or small and to think you’re not is career suicide. It’s more than the next generation firewall or latest black box technology, it’s about intelligence – Collection and analytics, and lots of it. Organizations that are focusing on cutting edge, applied concepts like artificial intelligence, contextual analytics, cognitive analysis, natural language processing and quantum technologies will advance and ultimately survive into the next frontier of the cyber war.

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  • Law Firms are the Next Frontier for Hackers says CEO Jeremy Samide

    CEO Jeremy Samide sums up the threats to law firms:

    Law firms have become prime targets for cyber attacks as they hold many of the secrets to theirbeloved clients to include big organizations, CEO’s, celebrities and the like.  In this cyber cold war, the words “privileged and confidential” are taking on new meanings and becoming more difficult to uphold.  Access to unfiltered communications, documents, contracts and signatures to inherently sensitive information is up for grabs and eventually in many cases, up for sale.  Ransomware has also become a problem within law firms.  Many attorneys still today, believe that if something is stamped “privileged and confidential” it is immune to the bad actors who are constantly finding new subterfuges into law firms wreaking havoc and stealing proprietary information to either exploit, destroy, expose or sell on the dark web.

    In many cases, law firms that specialize in patent, trademarks and intellectual property are considered an even greater risk as they are top on the list for many state sponsored hacker groups around the world.  We have witnessed companies that have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in research and development, win patents and trademarks only to have the fruits of their labor erode over a short period of time as hackers ransacked their corporate servers as well as the servers of their law firm where most of their patents and trademarks were filed backed by thousands of research documents.

    There are viable solutions that can help protect and mitigate the risk of the next cyber attack within law firms.   Stealthcare’s managed services, education & training, and threat intelligence can help with all of these.

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  • Stealthcare Analyzes the Cyber Risks to Energy Systems and Critical Infrastructure

    Critical infrastructure may be the next big target for hackers. Evidence has shown hacking attempts and an evolution of sophistication of methods. Energy is critical to our society, and it’s our duty to examine that the subject in detail. We’ll look at the attacks that have already happened, the methods, the motivations of the actors, the trends of we’re seeing, and what’s being done about it.

    There are many factors at play interacting with each other: nation-states, hackers looking for profit, our increasingly technology-dependent world, and government efforts at protection. Of all the cyber threats we face, this is likely the biggest.

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  • Cyber security at RNC: Some hackers 'very sophisticated,' expert says

    Jeremy Samide is a cyber expert. He's more aware than most of the risks presented by the Republican National Convention.

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  • Stealthcare Predicts GOP Convention in Cleveland will spark numerous cyber attacks

    "The ability of a hacktivist group to disrupt Trump's campaign is nothing compared to a possible state-sponsored cyber attack against the GOP Convention in July," Jeremy Samide, Stealthcare, CEO.

    CLEVELAND, July 7, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- "The GOP Convention is the next likely target for a major hack, but it probably won't come from hacktivists who are indignant over Donald Trump's confrontational manner and offensive positions," says cybersecurity authority Jeremy Samide, CEO of Stealthcare.

    Stealthcare, a global cybersecurity firm headquartered in Cleveland—site of the GOP Convention, July 18-21, is warning businesses to increase their vigilance during this time.

    For predictors of a GOP Convention cyber attack, Samide points to, "the recent attack against the Democratic National Committee (DNC) that compromised donor lists and other information. This was not by a hacktivist group but rather all evidence points directly to state-sponsored hackers...

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  • "As hospital ransomware attacks spread to other industries, total corporate solutions are needed," Says Jeremy Samide, CEO of Stealthcare and a global cybersecurity authority.

    "As hospital ransomware attacks spread to other industries, total corporate solutions are needed," Says Jeremy Samide, CEO of Stealthcare and a global cybersecurity authority.

    "Holding hospital data hostage is just the tip of the spear in a new wave of ransomware attacks that are now spreading to law firms and financial institutions," Jeremy Samide, global cybersecurity expert says.

    CLEVELAND, June 14, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- "The recent cyber attacks against hospitals in California and Kentucky, during which hackers encrypted their data with new strains of ransomware, are spreading to other industries," says Jeremy Samide, CEO of Stealthcare, a cybersecurity-consulting firm whose clients receive intelligence on the latest hacker strategies and practical solutions to defeat them.

    "Holding medical, billing and insurance records hostage is just the just the tip of the arrow in a new wave of ransomware attacks that are now spreading to law firms and financial...

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